The Dakota 1 West 72nd Street, New York City, New York. Built from 1880 to 1884. With a noteworthy zero vacancies since its opening in 1884, The Dakota is best known as being the home to the elite, rich, and famous. The building has housed celebrities from John Lennon (who was murdered right in front of the building) and Yoko Ono to Maury Povich.  Rumors of hauntings and ghost sightings have been reported in this historic residence. 

The Dakota

1 West 72nd Street, New York City, New York.

Built from 1880 to 1884.

With a noteworthy zero vacancies since its opening in 1884, The Dakota is best known as being the home to the elite, rich, and famous. The building has housed celebrities from John Lennon (who was murdered right in front of the building) and Yoko Ono to Maury Povich. 

Rumors of hauntings and ghost sightings have been reported in this historic residence. 

The Empire State Building 350 5th Avenue, New York, New York. Built in 1930. The Empire State Building stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years from 1931 until 1970. It was the first building to have over 100 floors.  The building opened during the great depression, resulting in much of its office space remaining empty. This earned the tower the nickname of the “Empty State Building,” and it remained unprofitable until 1950.

The Empire State Building

350 5th Avenue, New York, New York.

Built in 1930.

The Empire State Building stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years from 1931 until 1970. It was the first building to have over 100 floors. 

The building opened during the great depression, resulting in much of its office space remaining empty. This earned the tower the nickname of the “Empty State Building,” and it remained unprofitable until 1950.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 1071 5th Avenue, New York, New York. Built in 1959.  The Guggenheim Museum was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The design process from start until the final idea of the space being a "temple of the spirit" took fifteen years.   The venue was first called the "Museum of Non-Objective Painting" upon its opening in 1939, but was renamed in 1952 after the death of its founder.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 5th Avenue, New York, New York.

Built in 1959. 

The Guggenheim Museum was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The design process from start until the final idea of the space being a "temple of the spirit" took fifteen years.  

The venue was first called the "Museum of Non-Objective Painting" upon its opening in 1939, but was renamed in 1952 after the death of its founder.

Central Railroad of New Jersey Termianl Liberty State Park, Audrey Zapp Drive, New Jersey City, New Jersey. Built in 1889, partially abandoned in 1967. An estimated 10.5 million people entered The United States through this station during the time in was in operation. The railroad terminal was closed and abandoned in 1967 but ferries continued using the station until Hurricane Sandy in 2012. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey Termianl

Liberty State Park, Audrey Zapp Drive, New Jersey City, New Jersey.

Built in 1889, partially abandoned in 1967.

An estimated 10.5 million people entered The United States through this station during the time in was in operation. The railroad terminal was closed and abandoned in 1967 but ferries continued using the station until Hurricane Sandy in 2012. 

The Spellman House 64 East Main Street, Freehold, New Jersey. As seen on TV! This Victorian building was used as the exterior of the main character's residence on the 1996 (through 2003) show "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch." The house, a two   building property complete with Carriage House, is now an office space for multiple occupants (sadly, none of which are witches.)

The Spellman House

64 East Main Street, Freehold, New Jersey.

As seen on TV! This Victorian building was used as the exterior of the main character's residence on the 1996 (through 2003) show "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch." The house, a two   building property complete with Carriage House, is now an office space for multiple occupants (sadly, none of which are witches.)