Memorial Student Union Tower of The University of Missouri 518 Hitt Street, Columbia, Missouri. Built between 1921 and 1926.  The Memorial Student Union Tower was originally built to honor students who died during World War I. Inscribed into the tower’s archway are the names of these 117 men. The process of raising the tower (and its attached buildings) was a nearly fifty year journey due to economic downturns, expensive plans, and fundraising difficulties. The final piece of the structure was in place and dedicated in 1963 and now serves as a monument and student union where alumni, students and faculty can gather.

Memorial Student Union Tower of The University of Missouri

518 Hitt Street, Columbia, Missouri.

Built between 1921 and 1926. 

The Memorial Student Union Tower was originally built to honor students who died during World War I. Inscribed into the tower’s archway are the names of these 117 men. The process of raising the tower (and its attached buildings) was a nearly fifty year journey due to economic downturns, expensive plans, and fundraising difficulties. The final piece of the structure was in place and dedicated in 1963 and now serves as a monument and student union where alumni, students and faculty can gather.

The Pink House 17 Chalmers Street, Charleston, South Carolina. Built between 1694 and 1712. This historic house (and now art gallery) is the oldest building in Charleston, and one of the oldest in South Carolina. The house was built with "Bermuda Stone," a West Indian coral stone with a natural pink color, that gave this house its name from the very beginning. The curved roof tiles are said to have gotten their shape from bending over the thighs of the workmen who formed them. The interior of the house helps push this building to the title of being Charleston's most architecturally unique building with three floors, each consisting of one room per floor.

The Pink House

17 Chalmers Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

Built between 1694 and 1712.

This historic house (and now art gallery) is the oldest building in Charleston, and one of the oldest in South Carolina. The house was built with "Bermuda Stone," a West Indian coral stone with a natural pink color, that gave this house its name from the very beginning. The curved roof tiles are said to have gotten their shape from bending over the thighs of the workmen who formed them. The interior of the house helps push this building to the title of being Charleston's most architecturally unique building with three floors, each consisting of one room per floor.

The Saulda Cottages (Boyd Mansion) 150 Boyd Drive, Flat Rock, North Carolina. Built in 1836. The Saluda Cottages were built in 1836 by Count Joseph Marie Gabriel St. Xavier deChoiseul, the French Consul to Charleston and Savannah, and cousin to King Louis Philippe of France. The home features a garden complete with fountains and statues, a horse stable, volleyball/ tennis court, grand ballroom, covered porches, and thirteen fireplaces.

The Saulda Cottages (Boyd Mansion)

150 Boyd Drive, Flat Rock, North Carolina.

Built in 1836.

The Saluda Cottages were built in 1836 by Count Joseph Marie Gabriel St. Xavier deChoiseul, the French Consul to Charleston and Savannah, and cousin to King Louis Philippe of France. The home features a garden complete with fountains and statues, a horse stable, volleyball/ tennis court, grand ballroom, covered porches, and thirteen fireplaces.