The University of Texas Tower   110 Inner Campus Drive. Austin, Texas.  Built from 1934-1937.   The Main Building (more commonly called The Tower) was originally built to serve as a library space with an eighteen-story dumbwaiter bringing book requests from floor to floor. This proved to be a very inefficient system and the dumbwaiter was later replaced with network and computer cabling. The building is now mainly administrative offices, but it holds onto its original intentions by housing a three-floor life sciences library and the Miriam Lutcher Stark Library of English Romanticist works. 

The University of Texas Tower

110 Inner Campus Drive. Austin, Texas.

Built from 1934-1937. 

The Main Building (more commonly called The Tower) was originally built to serve as a library space with an eighteen-story dumbwaiter bringing book requests from floor to floor. This proved to be a very inefficient system and the dumbwaiter was later replaced with network and computer cabling. The building is now mainly administrative offices, but it holds onto its original intentions by housing a three-floor life sciences library and the Miriam Lutcher Stark Library of English Romanticist works. 

  The Alamo   300 Alamo Plaza. San Antonio, Texas.  Built in 1724.  The Alamo began as a Spanish Mission in the early 1700’s. It provided local indigenous people protection (and conversion, of course) from other hostile tribes. At one point in its history, The Alamo was used as a commercial warehouse, storing wholesale grocery items.  The Battle of the Alamo served as a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Despite being a loss, it was the fuel for revenge afterwards that led to the defeat of the Mexican Army in 1836.

The Alamo

300 Alamo Plaza. San Antonio, Texas.

Built in 1724.

The Alamo began as a Spanish Mission in the early 1700’s. It provided local indigenous people protection (and conversion, of course) from other hostile tribes. At one point in its history, The Alamo was used as a commercial warehouse, storing wholesale grocery items.

The Battle of the Alamo served as a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Despite being a loss, it was the fuel for revenge afterwards that led to the defeat of the Mexican Army in 1836.

 Franklin Barbecue. 900 East 11th Street, Austin Texas.       Franklin Barbecue   900 East 11th Street. Austin, Texas.  Franklin Barbecue was opened by Aaron Franklin in 2009 in a small trailer right off of the interstate in Austin, Texas. Since its humble openings, Franklin Barbecue has grown to be one of the most popular and critically acclaimed barbecue joints in the United States - even winning Aaron a James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef: Southwest.

Franklin Barbecue. 900 East 11th Street, Austin Texas. 

 

Franklin Barbecue

900 East 11th Street. Austin, Texas.

Franklin Barbecue was opened by Aaron Franklin in 2009 in a small trailer right off of the interstate in Austin, Texas. Since its humble openings, Franklin Barbecue has grown to be one of the most popular and critically acclaimed barbecue joints in the United States - even winning Aaron a James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef: Southwest.

  Torchy's Tacos   1822 S. Congress Avenue. Austin Texas.  Opened in 2016.  Taking over the iconic Fran’s Hamburgers’ spot on South Congress, Torchy’s Tacos expanded it’s Austin footprint in 2016 with this location. The building was designed by architect Jamie Chioco of Chioco Design as a nod to the former Fran’s 1950’s drive-in diner vibe.  Torchy’s Tacos began in 2006 out of a trailer and has now expanded to nearly 40 locations across Texas. 

Torchy's Tacos

1822 S. Congress Avenue. Austin Texas.

Opened in 2016.

Taking over the iconic Fran’s Hamburgers’ spot on South Congress, Torchy’s Tacos expanded it’s Austin footprint in 2016 with this location. The building was designed by architect Jamie Chioco of Chioco Design as a nod to the former Fran’s 1950’s drive-in diner vibe.

Torchy’s Tacos began in 2006 out of a trailer and has now expanded to nearly 40 locations across Texas. 

  Long Center for The Performing Arts   701 West Riverside Drive. Austin, Texas.  Built in 1959, renovated and added to in 2008.   The original building in this spot was the Lester E. Palmer Auditorium, built in 1959. It still stands as the center's main venue with much of its design elements remaining.  The Long Center supports the Austin Symphony Orchestra, Austin Lyric Opera and Ballet in its multiple performance and event spaces.

Long Center for The Performing Arts

701 West Riverside Drive. Austin, Texas.

Built in 1959, renovated and added to in 2008. 

The original building in this spot was the Lester E. Palmer Auditorium, built in 1959. It still stands as the center's main venue with much of its design elements remaining.  The Long Center supports the Austin Symphony Orchestra, Austin Lyric Opera and Ballet in its multiple performance and event spaces.

  Paramount Theater   713 Congress Avenue. Austin, Texas.  Built in 1915.  Since its creation as the Gaiety Theater, the Paramount has hosted vaudeville, musicals, live stage productions, Hollywood-sized premiers, and, of course, movies.  In the early-70's, downtown Austin was facing a slew of murder and crime that essentially closed down the streets after 5:30PM. Repairs at the Paramount stopped, and it was slated to shut down and become a Holiday Inn. Luckily the tides turned and the Paramount is thriving, screening over 100 films and hosting over 250 performances each year.

Paramount Theater

713 Congress Avenue. Austin, Texas.

Built in 1915.

Since its creation as the Gaiety Theater, the Paramount has hosted vaudeville, musicals, live stage productions, Hollywood-sized premiers, and, of course, movies.

In the early-70's, downtown Austin was facing a slew of murder and crime that essentially closed down the streets after 5:30PM. Repairs at the Paramount stopped, and it was slated to shut down and become a Holiday Inn. Luckily the tides turned and the Paramount is thriving, screening over 100 films and hosting over 250 performances each year.

  Texas State Capitol   1100 Congress Avenue. Austin, Texas.  Built in 1888.  The Texas State Capitol was built in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, designed by architect Elijah E. Meyers. A 75 million dollar expansion was added in 1993.   This building contains more floor space than any other state capitol (bigger in Texas and such.) Because of its beauty, there are laws in place that prohibit obstructing the view of the building. 

Texas State Capitol

1100 Congress Avenue. Austin, Texas.

Built in 1888.

The Texas State Capitol was built in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, designed by architect Elijah E. Meyers. A 75 million dollar expansion was added in 1993. 

This building contains more floor space than any other state capitol (bigger in Texas and such.) Because of its beauty, there are laws in place that prohibit obstructing the view of the building. 

  The Driskill Hotel   604 Brazos Street. Austin, Texas.  Built in 1886.  The Driskill Hotel is the oldest operating hotel in Austin. It was conceived and funded (at a cost of $400,000) by Col. Jesse Driskill, a cattle baron, who aimed to build "the finest hotel south of St. Louis." The hotel is rumored to have been built with an entrance just for women so as to avoid the rough language used by the cattlemen in the lobby.  A night, including meals, in The Driskill upon opening would have run $2.50 to $5.00, an unheard of sum for the location at the time.

The Driskill Hotel

604 Brazos Street. Austin, Texas.

Built in 1886.

The Driskill Hotel is the oldest operating hotel in Austin. It was conceived and funded (at a cost of $400,000) by Col. Jesse Driskill, a cattle baron, who aimed to build "the finest hotel south of St. Louis." The hotel is rumored to have been built with an entrance just for women so as to avoid the rough language used by the cattlemen in the lobby.

A night, including meals, in The Driskill upon opening would have run $2.50 to $5.00, an unheard of sum for the location at the time.